Posted January 17, 2014

Former UNC football player says academic counselors led him to no-show classes

NCAAF
Michael McAdoo (Joe Robbins/Getty Images)

Michael McAdoo was kicked off the UNC football team in 2010. (Joe Robbins/Getty Images)

Former North Carolina defensive end Michael McAdoo said he was steered toward four no-show classes by the school’s academic counselors, according to Dan Kane of The News & Observer in Raleigh, N.C.

McAdoo, who told Kane the academic environment for UNC athletes was “a scam,” was kicked off the football team in 2010 after a tutor did “improper work” on three of his term papers. He sued the school for breach of contract, but the university countered by saying it had kept him on athletic scholarship.

The no-show classes, including AFAM 280: Blacks in North Carolina, which McAdoo was enrolled in, led to a fraud charge against Julius Nyang’oro, the former African and Afro-American Studies chairman at the school. The classes were reportedly filled with football players.

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“They pretty much put me in that class,” McAdoo said of the counselors in the Academic Support Program for Student-Athletes. “They pretty much told me … that I might want to consider that class and I really don’t have much time to think about it, so [I might] want to take that class while it was available.”

More than 200 classes either confirmed or suspected of having never met are being used as evidence in a lawsuit representing college athletes who want a cut of the revenues from items sold with their names, images and likenesses, according to The News & Observer.

“The athletes are using the case to contest the NCAA’s claim that the athletes were getting a meaningful education in exchange for helping universities and the NCAA make millions of dollars from their exploits on the football field or basketball court,” Kane wrote about the five-year-old case, which will be heard in court in June.

After two years with the Ravens, McAdoo played the 2013 season for the Winnipeg Blue Bombers of the CFL.

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6 comments
bakdoc1980
bakdoc1980

Many -- maybe most? -- athletes at high profile schools major in one curriculum : Eligibility 101. The next time you see an athlete interviewed remind yourself that this is a college student , perhaps on the verge of completing his fifth year. Would you hire him based on his grammar, speech, sentence structure etc? How does he represent the academic standards of his school? Would you be content if he was your son, that he was properly prepared to do anything other than become a pro athlete? Which is a long shot for 98 % of these kids.It is sickening....

SkippyShelton
SkippyShelton

And Mr. McAdoo was forced to take these dummy classes? He is a grown man and should have taken responsibility for his own education...just because the school sees you as dump black jock whose sole purpose is to chase a ball you don't have to comply.



giwan1259
giwan1259

McAdoo had a choice didn't he? He did not have to enroll in those classes did he? He was "steered" not forced. Anyone care to check on those details?

coalter.martin
coalter.martin

I'm sure it's like that for a lot of athletes at a lot of schools. I'm sure it's also nothing like that for a lot of other athletes. I went to UT and I do remember Justin Tucker (former kicker) being in one of my classes. I think it was one of my business minor classes. My sister went to UT as well and she says Major Applewhite was in one of her courses. I'm guessing it was a history course because that was her major. That said, I'm not trying to say it doesn't happen at UT. It very well might to some extent for some athletes. I really have no idea.


Everyone can choose their own classes, to my knowledge, regardless of what counselors advise. If an athlete had a problem with it, then why not say something when it's happening instead of years later after they're past their prime?

SagebielUT
SagebielUT

@coalter.martin  When I was a TA/lecturer at UT the student-athletes were always in class, always at office hours, and on time with assignments. As I recall someone - counselor or coach?- checked to be sure this was the case. As a result, the athletes in my classes generally performed well.


It's too bad that counselors in other cases direct their efforts to skirting the system instead of working with it the way they have (at least in my experience) at Texas.