Posted December 10, 2013

Report: Texas coach Mack Brown expected to resign this week

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Texas head coach Mack Brown is 157-45 since arriving in Austin in 1998. (Stacy Revere/Getty Images)

Texas head coach Mack Brown is 158-47 since arriving in Austin in 1998. (Stacy Revere/Getty Images)

Despite saying Tuesday that he is not going resign as head coach of the University of Texas football team, Mack Brown is expected to step down from the position by the end of this week, Chip Brown of Orangebloods.com reports.

Brown’s contract paid him $5.4 million this season and is under contract through Dec. 31, 2020. According to the report, Brown will receive the $2.75 million buyout in his contract.

Brown, 62, spent the past 16 seasons at Texas, leading them to 10 bowl victories and a national championship.  Texas has an overall record of 30-20 in the past four seasons, including 18-17 in the Big 12.

He is 238-116-1 in 29 seasons as a collegiate head coach at Texas, North Carolina, and Tulane.

Brown’s job security had been the topic of conversation all season, especially after the Longhorns started 1-2 after a home loss to Ole Miss.

“We continue to discuss the future of Texas football,” Texas men’s athletic director Steve Patterson said in a statement. “Mack Brown has not resigned. And, no decisions have been made.”

Texas (8-4) plays Oregon in the Alamo Bowl on Dec. 30.

More from Orangebloods.com:

The Texas football banquet Friday night was expected to be a celebration of the Mack Brown era, sources said. The Valero Alamo Bowl against Oregon is expected to be Brown’s last game at Texas.

“Mack Brown loves Texas and wants what’s in the best interest of Texas and what’s in the best interest of Mack Brown,” one high-level source said. “I don’t think it’s been an easy decision. But he doesn’t want negativity around the program he helped unify.”

THAMEL: Mack Brown may resign, but questions still loom in Texas athletics


1 comments
JillHolmes
JillHolmes

Good luck Coach, whatever you decide to do. That's a tough job in a school like Texas for 16 years, no matter what kind of support you receive.