Posted November 13, 2013

Sam Hurd sentenced to 15 years in prison

NFL
Sam Hurd faced life in prison for drug trafficking. (MCT via Getty Images)

Sam Hurd faced life in prison for drug trafficking. (MCT via Getty Images)

Former NFL player Sam Hurd was sentenced to 15 years in prison for drug trafficking on Wednesday.

Hurd, a former wide receiver for the Bears and Cowboys, faced life in prison. He had pleaded guilty to a single drug trafficking charge in April.

Hurd was arrested on Dec. 14, 2011 and indicted on Jan. 4, 2012. He was originally expected to face five to 20 years in prison, but in July, the life sentence recommendation was made.

On Tuesday, the MMQB published an investigation into Hurd’s case that raised questions about the prosecution’s portrayal of Hurd as a drug kingpin.


32 comments
STL47
STL47

Obviously he was guilty of conspiracy if they had talked about distribution with the intent to act, but this whole situation is fishy as hell.  The fact that he was set up by an "informant", a criminal among criminals, is pretty significant.  It means that the informant will be getting an incredibly light sentence if they are even charged at all. Yes, ultimately, Mr. Hurd is responsible for his actions... but if this is a friend who got busted, then told the cops he could bring them an NFL player on BIG charges (them Feds LOVE to be able to say the word "kilo" after a bust), then talked his friend Sam into getting into a more lucrative side business than pot, all with the intent to flip on him and have him arrested for the coke, and thus transferring the penalty of drug trafficking to him, then the wrong person went to jail, and for WAY too long.  If we went around asking people if they were willing to take a key and go sell it, with an actual kilo of cocaine in a bag to offer them... we would fill the prisons much faster than we are already managing to.  That is why entrapment is illegal.  Most people that talk down on drug dealers operating for profit have never had the chance to make a fortune for almost no work staring them right in the face, risk or not - the money affects how you act.  Putting someone in a position they would not otherwise have been in order to arrest them for that act is despicable, and is immediately the likelihood when you read that an informant was making the SALE and not the BUY. When you are going after the big fish, you bust the person that can supply the cocaine, not the person who wants to buy some - unless you would rather bust the person who's name will make the papers and ensure your agency keeps getting lots of attention, and hopefully as a result, lots of Federal dollars to continue their awesome job of keeping drugs off the street... what an incredible waste of money.

DMalone
DMalone

Todd Christensen died today and the story has not yet been reported by SI but this lowlife is the SI headliner?  This moron got what he deserved.  End this story and write something positive about an NFL legend:  Todd Christensen.  SI:  get a clue.

Jessica2
Jessica2

Just your typical everyday ghetto thug NFL playa, holla @ yo! boy.....

TeeHolmes
TeeHolmes

Another sad statistic involving a minority citizen. But you have no one to blame but yourself. you were literally and figuratively living a dream, but that wasn't good enough for you. Get on your knees and give thanks that it wasn't life. You can get a second chance.

Ason
Ason

Drug laws in this country are a travesty just waiting to happen. having said that it seems like sam had no idea of the danger in the game he was playing,conspiracy vague as it may be has resulted in100,000's of thousands of people in jail with sentences not matching actually activity..just sad & stupid to even get mixed up for no good reason at all.

noble6_fms
noble6_fms

Really sad case of a young man screwing up his life. If you've followed the story, Sam never sold a single gram of cocaine. Seems he was set up by the government by means of entrapment. Then all his "friends" and cousin made deals with the DA through lying to set him up so they could get lighter sentences.  The guy is very naive, and never should have put himself in this situation. I have to think he is very immature, or perhaps all the ganja he smoked distorted his reality. I feel for the guy. I am a 58 year old white dude who did drugs as a youth, but haven't done any in 30 years. I think 2-4 years would have been appropriate.

Matthew53
Matthew53

Another ex cowboy with a drug problem?

MikeHarrison
MikeHarrison

All he had to do was walk away without the bag and he would probably still be playing today.  But no, he was stupid and took the bag containing a kilo, and got nailed with it.

yadda71
yadda71

Seemed like he was looking to branch out into coke. He won't do the full 15. 

Yeah just because a guy is rich does not mean he is smart. Isiah Rider was making 4 million a yeah and got busted selling stolen cell phones out of the trunk of his car. 

Just say no, kids.

NebojsaTodorovic
NebojsaTodorovic

Welcome to the new world order.  Think crime.  He used, and maybe trafficked, a lot of weed.  Something that should be legal if it weren't for issues on how to manage that product in our society.  15 years is ridiculous, but I guess a message is what this was about.

Schultz
Schultz

Fair after thinking he'd get Life but really it was Agents wanting to make a BIG SPLASH NEWS PAPER ARREST But is he guilty? Yes. Did he deserve Life? NO.

iamHoraceKnight
iamHoraceKnight

After reading the background, seems like an over-zealous prosecution will have him sit in Jail for about 10 more years than needed.  It appears that he purchased LOTS of weed for personal and recreational use, but he was charged with trafficking cocaine. Was there any evidence that he actually moved/trafficked any cocaine?  Seems like he should have went to trial.  He def did some wrong, but 15 years seems excessive.  He was given a Kilo by an informant, therefore, would't that be a possession charge? 

Randall_Pink
Randall_Pink

@DMalone He never sold an ounce of cocaine. Our beloved government used him as a patsy with our draconic drug laws. Our government makes a killing off drugs. Meanwhile, they fill our prisons full of guys like this. He didn't hurt anyone and didn't even sell any drugs. crock of sh**

fords74
fords74

@TeeHolmes His second chance when he gets out will be washing dishes at IHOP

Macks
Macks

@noble6_fms Really!!!! That's hilarious you think you could get all of these folks both criminal and government to agree to frame someone. That is so ridonculous I'll bet you think the police have secretly bugged your home? Sam seems like he is just dumb and got caught up in the idea of making more money and being the guy who shows up to the party with lots of drugs. But who knows for sure. I feel bad for him. Hopefully, he will learn his lesson and get out earlier than his sentence.

lakawak
lakawak

@noble6_fms WHO CARES? People who never killed anyone but have every intention of doing so before being caught still go the prison. This man was going to distribute something that DEFINITELY would have resulted in shattered lives and very probably dozens of deaths. NOBODY forced him to do that. NO ONE forced him to take that kilo of cocaine and walk out of that restaurant with the intent to distribute it. That was all HIS choice.

lakawak
lakawak

@yadda71 It is a federal charge. That makes it pretty likely he will do at least most of that 15 years. This guy better not have any plans for his 30s.

Macks
Macks

@NebojsaTodorovic Weed was his stepping stone to the cocaine, obviously. No don't legalize the stepping stone.

lakawak
lakawak

@NebojsaTodorovic Seriosuly...you are such an idiot. There is a difference between THINKING about doing something, and making all the arrangements to do it with EVERY intention of going through with it...then TAKING THE COCAINE.

Just because they stopped him before he took the cocaine (which is a crime in and of itself) doesn't mean the is innocent. FAILING to commit a crime you intended to do does not get you off scot free of the punishment of the crime. If failing was a good thing, you would be a successful person.

AYahoo!u5er
AYahoo!u5er

@NebojsaTodorovic Give me a break, he was running weed because it was illegal and as a result lucrative. If weed was legal he would be running something else which is a lot more dangerous. These guys don't give a hoot what they are selling as long as they can make money, don't turn this into a pro-weed vendetta.  

lakawak
lakawak

@iamHoraceKnight No...it appears that you are an idiot. HE DISTRIBUTED lots of marijuana for himself and lots of pother people.  (He freely admits that he sold a lot of marijuana.) Then he took a kilo of cocaine with the intent to distribute it...and WOULD HAVE DONE SO if he didn't get arrested first. 

Jut because he failed at his attempt to distribute something that would have killed many people does not make him not guilty.

RuKdingMe
RuKdingMe

I agree that 15 years seems too long for what appears to be a strange situation; guy was never reported to have sold cocaine or caught in the act of selling cocaine, and seemed entrapped by the informant to some extent.

(On the other hand, he was guilty of trafficking large quantities of marijuana, so maybe he was convicted on the wrong charge but was still guilty.  The real question is why a seemingly intelligent person who had risen to the top of his profession would risk everything to get so heavily involved in drugs.)


Psych
Psych

@iamHoraceKnight I could be wrong, but I believe when you possess a certain amount (I don't know what that amount is) it's considered possession with intent to sell. 

Getting involved with that amount of drugs is a bad move...I wish I could feel a little more sorry for him, but he definitely should have known better. 

lakawak
lakawak

@Randall_Pink @DMalone And that is why he was charged with CONSPIRACY. HE had a kilo of cocaine in a bag that he was INTENDING to sell, and made it clear he wanted to sell much more. IT is just he got caught before he could.

FAILING at a crime does not make you innocent, idiot.

STL47
STL47

@lakawak @NebojsaTodorovic Actually, failing to commit a crime means that you did not commit one, by definition.  He committed a crime that, under the law, does not require action to meet the requirements for facing a charge, merely intent to act.  Totally different.  Whether or not this is fair is a totally seprate issue from the fact that IT IS A THOUGHT CRIME.  He went to jail for an assumed intent.  There is no getting around that.   Also, the fact that planning a murder is prosecutable as conspiracy does not mean that drug offenses should be as well.  The danger to society is immenient in one case, abstract in the other.  That is why there is not really much of a charge for "conspiracy to commit burglary", even though you can get just as ready to rob someone as sell them a drug.

lakawak
lakawak

@RuKdingMe People with 5th grade educations should stop talking about legal terms. No one FORCED him to take that bag of cocaine with the intent to distribute it. It was HIS CHOICE. Hence, not entrapment.

drbcool
drbcool

"Seemingly" is the key word in your post. Maybe he's not that bright. Also, keep in mind that character flaws will ALWAYS trump intelligence. Lots of smart people have poor character and therefore do shady things. Prisons have lots of smart people inside.

Boogieman1281
Boogieman1281

@Psych @iamHoraceKnight Yep.  Amount determines attempt to distribute.  Even not profiting (e.g., just having people reimburse you the amount you paid) is still distribution.