Posted October 31, 2013

Report: Red Sox to make qualifying offers to Mike Napoli, Jacoby Ellsbury

MLB
Mike Napoli made the best of a one-year deal with the Red Sox. (Rob Tringali/MLB/Getty Images)

Mike Napoli made the best of a one-year deal with the Red Sox. (Rob Tringali/MLB/Getty Images)

The Red Sox plan to follow up short-term deals with first baseman Mike Napoli and shortstop Stephen Drew with $14.1 million qualifying offers, according to Jon Heyman of CBS Sports. Heyman reports that the Red Sox also plan to make a qualifying offer to outfielder Jacoby Ellsbury.

While the Red Sox would like to bring Napoli and Drew back to defend their World Series title, they also will set themselves up to receive compensatory first-round draft choices should either player leave.

Napoli left the Rangers and agreed to a three-year, $39 million deal with the Red Sox before a chronic hip condition was detected in a medical exam. He eventually settled for a one-year, $5 million guaranteed deal loaded with incentives. Hitting .259 with 23 home runs and 92 RBI helped him reach his original $13 million mark for the season. Now Napoli appears primed to seek another long-term deal.

VERDUCCI: This World Series belonged to David Ortiz

From ESPN.com:

Napoli said, “I want to be here. I love this place” in the midst of Wednesday night’s post-game celebration.

Drew is coming off a one-year, $9.5 million deal that saw him hit .253 with 13 home runs, 67 RBI and a high OPS (.777) among shortstops, while also proving himself fully recovered from an ankle injury suffered a season ago.

Ellsbury (.298, nine home runs, 53 RBI, .355 OPS, 52 SBs) is widely considered the second biggest name on the free-agent market behind Robinson Cano and may be the most likely of the trio to leave Boston.

Ellsbury said on Wednesday night that he wanted to enjoy celebrating his second World Series title with his teammates and Red Sox fans before even thinking about free agency.

From Boston.com:

“I haven’t even thought about it. You don’t get this many opportunities to play in the World Series. When you do, you want to capitalize on it. So, I haven’t thought about [free agency].”


34 comments
William27
William27

$14 million dollars is more than most american familes make in their entire lifetime.

PATHETIC !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

then they want $6 for a 50 cent hot dog !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


screw em all, I refuse to go to any game !

William27
William27

Ellsbury said on Wednesday night that he wanted to enjoy celebrating his second World Series title with his teammates and Red Sox fans before even thinking about free agency.

talk about a lie !!!!!! with Boras as his agent they already have a plan to try and screw some stupid owner out of $117 million dollars while most americans don't have enough to eat.

William27
William27

Napoli said, “I want to be here. I love this place”

translation: I want $305 million for 10 years

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AlvinaCyrus3

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Sneeral
Sneeral

Why would the Sox give a $14M offer to Drew with Xander Bogaerts ready to step in?

Delegator
Delegator

Some team (Texas? Seattle? Yankees?) will offer Ellsbury a 6- or 7-year contract at $15-20 million per year, and that will be that. Boston won't go more than 4-5 years particularly with Ellsbury's injury history. It's too bad, and there would be no hard feelings among many fans if he leaves (to anywhere but NY), but Ellsbury is a terrific player when healthy and I'd love to keep him in Boston. NO hard feelings 

Bjornagast
Bjornagast

@William27: it's your right not to go to professional sports games if you're disgusted with the salaries of the athletes. But the owners of the teams are charging amounts for tickets and cable rights based on what the market will bear. The purchasers of tickets, cable packages, etc. have basically said that they're willing to pay prices and fees that support $14 million/year salaries--and owner profit on top of those salaries.

Look, the owners, players, managers, FO, agents have over decades grown an industry that's worth many billions. In a *free* MLB market of labor, which players fought *hard* to establish, an athlete can consider dollar bids for his services and the owners compete for players. That's capitalism at work. 

Remember that very, very few players make it to the bigs and even fewer see big paydays. The average MLB playing careers is 5.6 years. Twenty percent of players last only a year in the bigs. 

jdane
jdane

@William27 Unfortunately, there are 37,000 other fans who will.   Join me listening to the radio.

memberofsociety
memberofsociety

@William27 The owners charge what people will pay...if the players didn't get payed so much the owners would just take a bigger cut.

jdane
jdane

@William27 Exactly how do you'screw' an owner out of money he is more than willing to pay?

William27
William27

get lost you terd,

I bet you are a guy using a stolen picture

cairochris
cairochris

@Sneeral To ensure they get a first-round draft pick should he depart.  A qualifying offer is not a contract unless the player accepts it.  No qualifying offer = no draft pick for the team if they leave.  

If Drew leaves you at least want to get a draft pick in return.  Same goes for Napoli and Ellsbury. 

Kayarbee
Kayarbee

@Sneeral so they can keep the left side of the infield intact and keep Middlebrooks as a utility infielder 3B/1B.

UnishowponyWherebeef
UnishowponyWherebeef

@Delegator This kind of talk just promotes the salary insanity that rules the major sports.

A baseball player should, in no way, make more that $250k per year, max! Babe Ruth maxed out at $80k ($1.2M today) in 1931 but heck he was Babe Ruth.

Ticket prices for a game should be $10.

Middle class people are being priced out of sports. 

An NFL ticket  costs over $100 each.

It costs about $500 for a family of four to experience a baseball game (outside of Tampa, that is).

Soon only 1%-ers will be able to see a game in person.

Sneeral
Sneeral

@Delegator No way Ellsbury gets that kind of contract. How did Carl Crawford's deal work out?

oasis1994
oasis1994

@Delegator 

I agree with you on Ellsbury. 

I think he will end up in Seattle. It makes the most sense of any team out there. He is from the area, Seattle needs any offense they can get, and they have the money.

The Sox will offer him 3 years max in my opinion. There is no reason to go any longer for an injury prone 30 year old that has really only had 1 very good season. I love this guy, but in the end it is a business decision (which as a fan I hate, but understand).


It's too soon to think about this! 

jdane
jdane

@UnishowponyWherebeef @Delegator Why "should" a ticket cost $10 when there are many people willing to pay $300?   As you should know, ticket prices are not directly related to player salaries.  They are a function of what people are willing to price, and various formulae of how to maximize profits.  These calculations would be exactly the same  whether players are making millions or are playing for free.

RedDan
RedDan

@UnishowponyWherebeef @Delegator Why are you focusing so much on player salaries and ignoring the insane profits made by owners, most of whom are using ballparks built by municipal bonds... i.e. taxpayer donation to owners' bottom lines. Players make millions, owners make billions... and owners use the billions to deflect attention to the players' millions.

Twons
Twons

@UnishowponyWherebeef @Delegator   Agreed! There are pretty much only three kinds of people attending Red Sox games now: People in the top 10% income bracket, people who have been given tickets (or bought them inexpensively from season ticket holders) and people who love the team so much they use most, if not all of their disposable income to buy tickets.

Somebody gave me 4 tickets to a game in the 2011 season and it still cost almost $40 per person after paying for parking, food and drinks (none of which were alcoholic). Why does a single bottle of water cost $4 when a whole case doesn't even cost that much when purchased @ retail? Because they know people have no other choice once they are in the park. This doesn't even count the gas, tolls and you're kids whining about getting a $25 hat or a $40 shirt.

Delegator
Delegator

@UnishowponyWherebeef @Delegator "This kind of talk" is not what promotes the insanity of sports salaries. The outlandish spending is a function of TV money flowing into sports, and the way in which major league teams equate spending money with competitiveness. 

It's just the free market at work. If enough people watch so that advertisers are willing to pay the fees that support networks spending billions for the rights to broadcast games, and if teams continue to sell enough tickets at the current prices, then salaries will stay high. Predicting what a particular player will receive in free agency has nothing to do with it.

Twons
Twons

@Sneeral @Delegator  Maybe, maybe not. You have to remember though, while Boston tries to squeak out the most player they can get for a "reasonable" price, many of the teams would love to grab a big name like Ellsbury at $15+ mil/yr (though probably loaded with incentives or deferred salary) on the hopes they will increase attendance and attract other high caliber players to their team.

Part of the reason Boston can pick and chose good players is that so many want a chance to play for a contender and will compromise their demands to do it. Once they have built their reputation, they go out to strike for gold.


Ellsbury is a high quality player but he has a history of sacrificing his health to make a play, he may get the big bucks, but any contract will very likely include incentives for him to stay healthy and play, much like Papi's contract did this year.

Delegator
Delegator

@Sneeral @Delegator Carl Crawford's deal was an albatross around Boston's neck. Yet the Dodgers took on Crawford, Beckett (who made how much money despite missing most of the year with injuries) and Gonzalez. Josh Hamilton got a 5-year deal at age 32 and with a history of substance abuse. Zack Greinke got a 6-year deal as a pitcher.

I don't see any basis for your assertion that teams will suddenly wise up and stop offering ridiculously long guaranteed contracts to injury-prone players who happen to have had a good season during their walk year. I'd love to see it happen, but I won't hold my breath.

William27
William27

@Sneeral @Delegator the way most of the insane deals work out, rich player and stupid team

all those stupid yankees contracts have come back to bite them in the behind other than 2009

Kayarbee
Kayarbee

@Delegator @UnishowponyWherebeef Yes, the free market is at work. It was at work in the 50's and 60's too, yet you could attend a game any time you wanted because ticket prices were in ranger for all but the poorest family. I remember going to doubleheaders with my Mom, sitting in the bleachers right behind the bullpens, eating a picnic lunch which was allowed in those days, and I doubt my mother broke a $10 bill, including getting to Fenway on the MTA.