Posted October 03, 2013

Syracuse coach Jim Boeheim: Paying players “really the most idiotic suggestion of all time”

NCAAB
Add Jim Boeheim's name to those who are against paying college players. (Ethan Miller/ Getty Images)

Add Syracuse coach Jim Boeheim’s name to those who are against paying college players. (Ethan Miller/Getty Images)

There have been many opinions on the subject of should college athletes get paid while they are in school or maintain their amateur status.

On Wednesday afternoon, Syracuse basketball coach Jim Boeheim let loose with his opinion on the matter.  Hint: He isn’t in favor of it.

“That’s really the most idiotic suggestion of all time. Jay Bilas has pushed it a little bit. And I respect Jay a lot. I think you have to understand something. It’s really very clear. This is really clear,” Boeheim said, via Syracuse The Post-Standard.

“I laughed all the time at Chris Webber, who said he didn’t get any money at Michigan because they sold his uniform and the school got all this money and he didn’t get a penny. He didn’t then say that because of the platform he had at Michigan where he made All-American and they went to the Final Four and that he ended up signing a pro contract and ended up making over $100 million playing basketball. Which is what the great players do, and those are the uniforms that sell in college.

Boeheim said that his players at Syracuse get everything they need to succeed.

“Our players get a $50,000 education. Some of them use Syracuse to develop their game, get the publicity they need, become a first-round pick and make money from basketball. Some of them like me get the scholarship, get the grades, get their education, get the chance to play basketball and then get to start life without any debt.

GLOCKNER: Conference catch-up: ACC


28 comments
muser
muser

What  Jimmie means is that his boosters take care of payroll responsibilities....

Mcg779
Mcg779

If players want to get paid after high school then join a pro league and do not go to college. These players have the option to join the NBA D League at age 18. College baseball has no problems using this system. As for football you also have the option to join the UFL at 18. No one is making these kids go to college, they can get paid and play somewhere else.

HarshRealities
HarshRealities

Title IX !!!   The second you start paying mens Basketball or Football players, womens advocates will be in court with a lawsuit saying the womens field hockey team players should also be paid from the same pool of money as mens sports. I don't think that is right, just what will happen. Womens sports should have the equal opportunity to raise revenues just like mens sports. But the courts have ruled that equal translates into same results.

djm4672
djm4672

The fact Webber made millions as a pro is irrelevant.  That is the idiotic thing here.  If he blew out his knee is his last college game that all goes away.  Dumb comment Boeheim.

sugaslim
sugaslim

of course its ridiculous says the man making millions of dollars a year

SeanHallenbeck
SeanHallenbeck

...says the man earning $1.8M to coach a basketball team.

j7apple
j7apple

I appreciate the "education" point, and that is why players should not worry about pay. So very very few ever make it to the professional level, that they should count their lucky stars they have a talent to be utilized to gain an education.

As with the really star players? That are one or two and done? Its probably an exploitation on both sides.

WHO*IS*ESPN
WHO*IS*ESPN

Sure and having a PEDO for an assistant is O.K.?

Cman
Cman

Jim is correct. Getting an education paid for is a pretty good deal if you ask me. I have to pay a pretty hefty amount for my kids that are going to college.

MidwestGolfFan
MidwestGolfFan

OK, Jimmy...take a big pay cut on your salary, to approximately what a full professor makes.  After all, the university exists for education.  And if you complain, we should laugh at you the way you laugh at college players who want to be paid:  a coach shouldn't make more than a prof, because that would mean the tail is wagging the dog. 

You're talking "platform," use the school as a vehicle to give you other deals -- books, autographs, whatever.

You're in, right, Jim?  Jim?  Hello...?

Adam
Adam

@ChicagoBob So a guy who continues to work every single day with college athletes at the highest level is out of touch on the issue of paying players?  Not sure I buy that.  Just because you disagree with his point of view doesn't make Boeheim out of touch.

MidwestGolfFan
MidwestGolfFan

@HarshRealities  

So?

College sports has gotten too big.  There's no reason why any team, from football to (alert for the humor impaired:  sarcasm coming) women's bean-bag-tossing should fly cross-country because they're a "Major D-I School." 

Time to cut ALL college sports down to size.

Will10
Will10

yeah but he didn't

Will10
Will10

He didnt get paid to play when he was in college

MidwestGolfFan
MidwestGolfFan

@j7apple  

So...Jimmy B. makes almost $2M a year in salary alone.  He is also allowed to pick up money on the side doing shows, books, etc.

His dozen or so players get $50K in scholarships.  TOTAL is around 1/3 what their coach makes, and they have very strict rules about outside money.

Yeah, seems right and just to me.

DaveVachon
DaveVachon

@Cman I understand your point Cman ... but your kids don't make their college revenue the way those athletes do. Your kids, while possibly the nicest kids on the planet, are not the revenue generators college athletes are.

MichaelUrciolo1
MichaelUrciolo1

@Cman That's a valid point, but I wonder if schools did pay players, over the course of four years, who would make more - the players or the school? I'm thinking the school. 


If schools DID go that route, every player, from starter to permanent bench warmer, in EVERY college should get the same amount. Some small amount to cover weekly expenses, perhaps $100 per week while they are playing? Just my two cents.

Will10
Will10

Hes responsible for more of Syracuse's revenue than a professor his. Hence why he gets paid more

StacyHutchens
StacyHutchens

@Will10 Yeah, but there are others who did and we don't get to hear about them because they did not get to make 100 mil in the NBA......

MidwestGolfFan
MidwestGolfFan

@Will10  

Boeheim was in college 50 years ago.  A lot has changed.

Back then, you didn't have multimillion-dollar salaries for coaches, education was taken far more seriously, and college sports didn't make much money.

You're comparing apples and oranges.

DaveG
DaveG

@MidwestGolfFan @j7apple Don't kid yourself about the value of a  "scholarship". It really doesn't matter to a school if there are 28 kids in a class or 29, Same prof, same number of TA's, and so forth.  Thus the marginal cost one extra student in a class is zero.  When you take into account that the only  real cost to the university is room, board and books you realize how little it actually costs a college to "educate" an athlete.  My guess is that the clothing sales alone from a big rivals weekend is enough to pay for all the basketball players fixed costs.  After that it's all profit.  Well you still have the millions of dollars that the coach gets ...

MidwestGolfFan
MidwestGolfFan

@Will10 

By that token, college athletes are responsible for far more revenue per capita, with millions via TV contracts, than average college students (50K per year minus financial aid).  They should be paid.

What's more, without college athletes, Boeheim wouldn't be getting $2M a year. 

jsmarkley
jsmarkley

@StacyHutchens @Will10 But they still got a free ride in college. Whether or not they use their time to get a degree or not is not the concern of the NCAA. The problem is the scholarships should be guaranteed for 4 yrs, not 1 yr. Also, how is the revenue these schools make still tax exempt?

MidwestGolfFan
MidwestGolfFan

...I will disagree on one point:  a lot of major colleges have classes, and in some cases majors ("General Studies," "Leisure Management") open only to jocks.  Then you have "personal tutors" (often school-designated cheaters), counselors (paper-pushing enablers) and other such stuff.  That all requires infrastructure, and costs a lot of money.