Posted July 29, 2013

Report: MLB to announce Biogenesis-related suspensions this week

MLB
(Streeter Lecka/Getty Images)

Alex Rodriguez reportedly could be suspended through the end of the 2014 season. (Streeter Lecka/Getty Images)

There are “strong indications” that Major League Baseball will announce further suspensions in the Biogenesis case this week, including a ban of Alex Rodriguez through next season, The New York Post‘s Joel Sherman and Ken Davidoff are reporting.

According to a report in the New York Daily News, Rodriguez could face a lifetime ban from baseball if he does not agree to an MLB-brokered deal. The Daily News reported that baseball is “armed with voluminous evidence they believe would warrant lifetime banishment.” A source close to Rodriguez told the paper, however, that he is “sticking to his story” and will not accept a deal.

For the league, making the announcement this week allows MLB to levy 50-game suspensions — the penalty for failing a performance-enhancing drug test for the first time — on the more than 15 players who are expected to face sanctions.

The league suspended Ryan Braun earlier than the rest of the offenders because he accepted the penalty without appeal. MLB wants to provide the other offenders the opportunity to serve their suspensions without appeal, as well, so they can start next season with a clean slate, according to the report.

VERDUCCI: Answering key questions in wake of Ryan Braun suspension >

Rodriguez is seeking a similar settlement to Braun, but will likely face much harsher penalties.

From The Post report:

It is expected other players will do the same this week. To that end, Rodriguez’s representatives met with MLB officials in the past few days, The Post has learned. It is believed A-Rod’s camp was trying to gain a better understanding of potential penalties. However, a member of Rodriguez’s team told The Post yesterday it is “unequivocally untrue” that Rodriguez is seeking a settlement.

Rodriguez does not fit into this category. It has become evident MLB is going to demand Rodriguez’s punishment far exceed Braun’s. That is because MLB believes the combination of being a user and obstructing the case demands a much stiffer penalty — especially because Rodriguez has admitted to previous drug use from 2001-03 and because MLB believes Rodriguez subsequently lied to its investigators in previous interviews about his usage.

Commissioner Bud Selig could ask for a lifetime ban of Rodriguez, but an arbitrator may rule that the penalty be reduced, and Rodriguez is prepared to fight any suspension, The Post reports.

The expectation was Rodriguez had hired a cavalry of lawyers, private investigators, crisis managers and spokesmen to fight any sanction. Publicly, his camp has been feisty — and more — in trying to mount a case that both MLB and the Yankees have tried to injure his reputation and keep him from playing.

CORCORAN: MLB to expand A-Rod investigation as result of Quad-Gate revelation


36 comments
QuikMix
QuikMix

Do we have a complete list of guys that are likely to get hit with this?

ClayPac
ClayPac

@QuikMix Alex Rodriguez, Nelson Cruz, Jhonny Peralta, Everth Cabrera, Jesus Montero, Francisco Cervelli, Melky Cabrera, Batrolo Colon, Yasmani Grandal, and 4 minor leaguers, two of which are no longer playing. 

I should note just because all of these names are listed here, they are not all connected in the same way and will most likely not receive the same punishment.

Reva P
Reva P

@ClayPac @QuikMix Each of Cabrera, Colon and Grandal have each already served a 50-game suspension.  Wouldn't another suspension for the same reason count as "double jeopardy"?

Reva P
Reva P

@ClayPac @Reva P @QuikMixApparently, the three players mentioned were all suspended for PED use ASSOCIATED with Biogensis, so it would be double jeopardy. nd MLB recognizes that, just as civic authorities do.

ClayPac
ClayPac

@Reva P @ClayPac @QuikMix Probably yeah. I suppose unless they can find some evidence that these are separate instances then they're looking at 100 games. 

WHO*IS*ESPN
WHO*IS*ESPN like.author.displayName 1 Like

Kinda doubt arod has ANY clout or can make any deal.

meats29
meats29

What a complete idiot A-Rod is. Bosch asked him for money for lawyers to fight MLB and A-Roid said no and now because of that A-Roids career and what was left of his reputation are completely done and his contract will probably be voided. He just had to lend a couple million to Bosch but he wouldn't do it even though he knew they had all of that evidence against him. Alex Rodriguez might be the biggest moron on the planet. This entire thing is happening because of him. All of these other guys are getting suspended because of him (not saying what they did was right). It's all because of him. Incredible. 

Reva P
Reva P

@meats29 And here I thought that the list of the biggest morons on the planet all stood behind the current mayor of Toronto, with the Tea Party firmly in second place.

Do I have to change my list?

GoPSULions
GoPSULions

@meats29 No all these things are a result of the actions he took, if he did, taking banned substances, not because he didn't go further to cover it up.

feboptimus703
feboptimus703

They say that Pete Rose bet on his own team to win. That's nothing compared to all of the juicing and record-breaking stats that are inflated and distorted by steroids.

JillHandy
JillHandy like.author.displayName 1 Like

@feboptimus703 Disagree.  They are both bad for the game.  But gambling has always been the biggest taboo, because they don't want the games to be fixed.  MLB doesn't want to look like professional wrestling where the outcome is predetermined.  That's why gambling will always be the biggest no-no for baseball.

Steroids, while they don't predetermine the outcome of games, are still bad, because it does affect the outcome of games and careers.  And they definitely should increase the penalties.  I think 1 season ban for first offense.  Lifetime ban for second offense, including a large fine and nullification of any remaining money on their contract.

joe6647
joe6647

In September 2011, reports surfaced that Ramirez was planning on playing in theDominican Winter Leaguefor theCibao Eagles. In a statement, the team said that Ramirez hoped to motivate other Major League stars to play in the country.[57]However, the MLB Commissioners office issued a statement that since the Dominican League is affiliated with MLB, Ramirez would not be eligible to play without first serving his mandated suspension.[58]

Upon hearing that his plans to play in the winter league would not work, Ramirez decided to formally request reinstatement with MLB and that he was willing to serve his 100 game suspension for the second violation of the drug policy. He stated that he was not prepared for retirement and that he will be available for any MLB team and if none show interest, then he will "play in Japan or some other place."[59]

On December 4 it was announced that Ramirez had formally filed the papers with the league to be reinstated to baseball and that an agreement had been reached between MLB and the Players Association that he would only need to serve a 50 game suspension instead of the original 100 games.[60]

joe6647
joe6647

On February 20, 2012, Ramirez signed a minor league contract with the Oakland Athletics. The deal called for a $500,000 salary if he made the MLB roster. However, he needed to serve the 50-game suspension before he could play for the team

OnePass
OnePass

A-Rod can retire for a year and return a la Manny Ramirez.

joe6647
joe6647 like.author.displayName 1 Like

@OnePass Manny was suspended, retired, returned and still had to serve the suspension.


Anyways, if Rodriguez retires he loses the monster contract he signed with the Yankees

OnePass
OnePass

@joe6647 @OnePass Manny never served a 50 game suspension.  He played in Taiwan.

Reva P
Reva P

@joe6647 @Truth9 @OnePass Unfortunately, that's true.

The problem here, the one that no one else is mentioning with regards to suspensions from MLB is that other professional baseball leagues are not bound by that suspension.  So, if you are suspended by MLB, you can still play in the minors and in any foreign league and probably in independent ball in the US.

Truth9
Truth9 like.author.displayName 1 Like

@OnePass @joe6647Manny served a 50-game suspension while with the Dodgers in 2009. You are incorrect, OnePass. Next?

bmyfive
bmyfive

If Daddy Bud drags this out just a little longer, he might be able to suspend a player after a team has made a big trade for him and is counting on him for their postseason push.

joe6647
joe6647 like.author.displayName 1 Like

Selig should impose a lifetime ban on Rodriguez that way if any reductions happen, arbitrators will likely give him at least a 100 game ban based off of Braun's suspension (that is if reports are true there is more evidence against A-rod than there was against Braun)

TheDoctorIsIn
TheDoctorIsIn

@joe6647 It's just not going to happen. The CBA is explicit and clear in stating that the penalty is 50 games. No matter what MLB may try to do, no matter how much they push for more than that penalty, it will be overturned in arbitration.


Reva P
Reva P

@TheDoctorIsIn @joe6647 It already has happened.  Ryan Braun was suspended for the rest of the season, which was 65 games as of the date that the ruling was announced.

Further, MLB considers that involvement with Biogenesis is a worst-case scenario, and that the 50/100/lifetime ban restrictions do not apply.  They can and will hand down suspensions of whatever length they please.  In the case of the man-child A-Roid, that will be for using, for attempting to tamper with evidence (by trying to purchase Biogenesis' records in order to destroy them) and not co-operating with the investigation.  Since each of these is a separate count, the lifetime ban is a distinct possibility.

Stop quoting the CBA on this one - both MLB and the MLBPA want these offenders dealt with, and dealt with as harshly as is possible.  Both parties want the sport to be as clean as possible, so the CBA simply doesn't apply.

Reva P
Reva P

@TheDoctorIsIn @Reva P @joe6647 Despite being a worse offender, in many ways, than is Ryan Braun?  I doubt that, and anyone looking dispassionately at this whole thin would doubt it as well.  

Braun got 65 games for being guilty of both taking PED's and not cooperating with the investigators, he got 65 games for (what is officially) a first-time offense.  If the man-child A-Roid did both of the above, along with trying to obfuscate the process by trying to purchase, with the intent to destroy, the records of Biogenesis.  

That's THREE problems for the Yankee, not two, and that's from a player who has, officially, tested positive, despite the fact that that having happened 10 years ago.  In that case, how can anyone passing any type of a penalty on any two individuals give the worse offender the light penalty?  In fact, using Braun's 65 games for two offenses as a guideline, and considering that A-Roid and not Braun tried to obstruct the investigation, a suspension for the rest of the year and the whole of the next season seems to be quite appropriate.  

This is a dispassionate analysis of this situation.  I'm not entirely certain that your analysis would be found to be the same.


Now, with regards to labor laws, remember that they allow any employer to fire any employee with or without cause in many, many places.  MLB more than certainly has cause to "fire" the Yank and any/all of this co-abusers.

TheDoctorIsIn
TheDoctorIsIn

@Reva P @TheDoctorIsIn @joe6647 You seem to be overly emotionally involved here Reva.

I'm not debating guilt or innocence; or what is right, just, or appropriate punishment for being guilty.

Labor law is what has precedence in a dispute.

If MLB hands down more than a 50 game ban and A-Rod fights it, the CBA is what will be the legal guideline.....doesn't matter what MLB wants, what the MLBPA agrees to, or what the media and fans want.

Mitigating circumstances (ex. cooperating with the investigation) and aggravating circumstances (attempting to interfere with the investigation) can be taken in to consideration by Selig at his discretion. 

The detail that is lost in all the discussion is that Selig loses the ability to throw down the hammer because of the specificity in the wording of the contract.

All I'm saying is this: My prediction is that IF Selig hands down a suspension of more than 50 days, AND A-Rod fights it, A-Rod will win and get a reduction to 50 days.


joe6647
joe6647

@TheDoctorIsIn @joe6647 It was Braun's 1st suspension and he got 65 games.  A-Rod is likely to get 100 since the evidence is reportedly stronger against him than it was against Braun

Reva P
Reva P

@TheDoctorIsIn @joe6647 Sorry, but you're wrong again.  By all accounts, Braun did deal down to 65 games.  What we don't know is how long his suspension was before he started to negotiate it down.

Please, read the stories instead of just the headlines.  They tell a much more thorough story, one that you are missing.

Reva P
Reva P

@joe6647 @TheDoctorIsIn You're forgetting that the man-child tried to buy the records so that he could have them destroyed.  That would be the equivalent of obstruction of justice, which itself is a considered to be a criminal activity.  MLB must contend with that hubris, too, in setting the penalty here.  No matter how you cut it, no matter why you think otherwise.  if that idiot gets anything less than a lifetime ban, it would be a miracle.

joe6647
joe6647 like.author.displayName 1 Like

@TheDoctorIsIn @joe6647 A-Rod has also reportedly tried to destroy evidence that links him and Biogenesis and admitted to previous drug use.  A 50 game suspension would be getting off scot free for him

TheDoctorIsIn
TheDoctorIsIn

@joe6647 @TheDoctorIsIn 

If Braun were to appeal, it would be reduced to 50 games. The contract is clear, and the arbitrator would have no choice but to follow the contract.

The stronger evidence only makes it easier to prove, it doesn't change the penalty.