Posted February 09, 2013

Report: Investigations find Curt Schilling’s Red Sox PED claim ‘baseless’

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Former Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling accused medical staffer Mike Reinold of suggesting PEDs as an option to recover from a shoulder injury in 2008. (Elsa/Getty Images)

Former Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling accused medical staffer Mike Reinold of suggesting PEDs as an option to recover from a shoulder injury in 2008. (Elsa/Getty Images)

Investigations by both the Boston Red Sox and Major League Baseball concluded that Red Sox medical staff member Mike Reinold did not urge former pitcher Curt Schilling to use performance-enhancing drugs to treat a shoulder injury in 2008, as Schilling claimed earlier this week, according to ESPN.com’s Gordon Edes.

The investigations began within a week after Schilling contacted Theo Epstein and Terry Francona — Boston’s general manager and manager at the time — about the accusation, and found it “completely baseless,” a source told Edes.

Schilling told ESPN Radio’s Colin Cowherd on Thursday that a Red Sox staff member suggested using PEDs as “a potential path I might want to pursue” before the pitcher ultimately retired after 20 seasons. Through further interviews, Schilling exonerated numerous members of the organization, but did not identify the accused staffer publicly.

Sources told Edes that Reinold, who the team hired as a rehabilitation coordinator in 2008 before cutting ties with him last year, was the accused staffer. The investigation concluded that the alleged incident “did not happen” and that Reinold “had no PED history whatsoever.”

“Schilling didn’t stand up enough [to investigators] for what he said happened,” one MLB source said. “Our investigation also discovered there was some [bad] history between Schilling and [Reinold].

“Investigators interviewed one witness to the conversation, who said he did not think in any way that [Reinold] said, ‘Hey, this is something you should consider.’

In an email reaction to the investigation’s conclusions, Schilling reiterated that the event in question happened.

“It happened. I informed the club, and there were other players that heard the conversation, who I spoke with after,” Schilling told ESPNBoston.com in an email. “The club immediately informed MLB, and they launched an investigation in which all parties were interviewed. If someone’s saying it didn’t happen, I am not sure why, since the two people in the discussion are gone — I’m retired and the other person was fired last year, I think. But it doesn’t shock me that people would deny it was ‘an event,’ though I am unsure why.”

MLB also released a statement on Friday saying that, after following protocol, it “thoroughly investigated the allegations and considers the matter closed.”


13 comments
Edward1
Edward1

Yeah, cuz Schill's got sooo much of a plus side to voluntarily involve his name in the steroid discussion. While baseball and its "investigators" have so much of a downside in this "nothing to see here" act. Henry's money walks the walk.  Suddenly, the words "official investigation" has baseball fans nodding in lockstep approval...hilarious.

 

 

pmccnn
pmccnn

Curt Schilling continues to embarrass himself in his retirement years. Interesting, when he was called to testify in front of Congress in 2005 - he down played the use of steroids in baseball, since then he's come up with several stories indicating a wide ranging use of PEDs during his career. When he signed with the Red Sox I remember one national reporter saying "Curt Schilling comes with an expiration tag" - he was 100 % correct. 

JoeCabot
JoeCabot

Seems like most don't like Curt Schilling but apparently the folks at MLB have short memories.   Like past claims of PED use, they quickly dismiss it.   Seems like many of those past stories that they attempted to brush away came back & bit them in a rather large way.  So again, they can dismiss this story in a matter of a few days?   Not defending Schilling, but it would seem that most of these tales end up having legs.

LouisGudema
LouisGudema

Schilling should stick to what he's good at: creating computer games. Oh, wait...

Sportmentary
Sportmentary

There were many people who didn't believe his claims prior to the investigations. Many people thought his claims were bizarre even with the knowledge of the PED culture of the past. If his claims were true why wouldn't the Red Sox throw Reinold under the bus? He's a no name of the organization and could have said he doesn't represent the club. Now if these claims are proven to be true no matter how remote that might be, the Sox and MLB will have a PR nightmare.

 

http://www.sportmentary.com/2013/02/curt-schilling-is-liar.html

KevinDoucette
KevinDoucette

Hilarious that people actually believe Major League Baseball over Schilling. They would never lie about this :-). Schilling may be the Don Cherry of baseball that doesn't mean he's lying. I would still actually believe him over MLB.

MattBugaj
MattBugaj

Funny, while some stars from the last 20 years won't be voted into the Hall because of suspected or confirmed PED use, Schilling, who may have been borderline and at least worth a second thought, will be kept out because no one likes him.

l.czolgosz66
l.czolgosz66

This guy attempts to get any kind of attention he can, non-stop. Not a real likable person either. I still remember him using the moment right after winning the world series as an attempt to endorse Bush for President, I thought then, what a creep.

jeebs
jeebs

He tried to take on the Bosox with a lie? The guy is desperate- let the alcoholism ensue.

anthony14
anthony14

I wouldn't believe anything that came out of that piece crap, Shilling.

bobinpowell
bobinpowell

 @KevinDoucette Kevin, it's also rather hilarious that you believe Schilling.  So, Curt, who are the other players that heard the conversation?  At least tell KevinCoucette, please?