Posted November 17, 2012

Report: Maryland, Rutgers in talks with Big Ten Conference

NCAAB

The University of Maryland is reportedly in serious talks to join the Big Ten Conference. (Rob Carr/Getty Images)

The University of Maryland is in advanced negotiations to join the Big Ten Conference, reports ESPN.com.

If Maryland goes to the Big Ten, Rutgers of the Big East is expected to follow suit. The addition of Maryland and Rutgers would give the Big Ten 14 members as the league gears toward negotiations on a new media rights deal when its first-tier rights expire in 2017.

Maryland would have to pay a $50 million exit fee to leave the Atlantic Coast Conference, which it has been a part of since 1953.

Maryland and Florida State were the two schools that voted against the exit fee, but both lost the vote. If Maryland leaves, the ACC would have 13 schools for college football and basketball. Reports say that each Big Ten school received a record $24.6 million in shared revenue.

Maryland recently dropped seven sports and having to pay $50 million would be hard to digest for the athletic department and campus.

Rutgers’ exit fee from the Big East Conference is $10 million if the school provides at least 27 months of notice before departing the conference. Rutgers is the ninth member of the Big East to either leave or announce they were leaving the conference since 2004.


9 comments
JoeZientek
JoeZientek

Really?  Who cares about Maryland football except recruits who does not know what to make of the uniforms.  Why would the Big 10 take on a losing program?  At best, Maryland football will be an easy win for the mid tiers of the Big 10. No recruiting base whatsoever.

 

Rutgers would be a good addition to the Big 10.  Notre Dame would be the ideal choice.

Rickapolis
Rickapolis

Why would Maryland want to make this move? The ACC is a basketball conference and UM is a basketball school. The Big10 is still a football conference (although very good in bball). UM is pathetic in football. They'll be a doormat in football in the Big10. I see no upside. Off course, this is the UM athletic department that hired Randy Edsall. And where does the 50 million come from after they cancelled all those other sports? If this isn't just some trial ballon for reasons unknown it is a VERY bad idea. As a Maryland resident it makes me quite angry.

MTBinDurham
MTBinDurham

 @Charlie5  @Rickapolis The Big Ten and the ACC are roughly equivalent as far as academic prestige.  (And before you spout off about southern public schools, check your assumptions with either US News or your favorite other university rankings.)

Rickapolis
Rickapolis

 @Charlie5 Maybe, Charlie, but I doubt that this is a move considered for academia. But I'd like to think that you're right.

MTBinDurham
MTBinDurham

 @Charlie5  @MTBinDurham  @Rickapolis See, that's funny.  Never in my Ph.D. program at UNC did anyone mention the AAU.  Nor when I was applying for research funding did anyone say anything about it.  When I was filling out NSF grants, nobody suggested that I mention the fact that UNC was in AAU.  When I was accepted to Minnesota for grad school, nobody mentioned the AAU membership.  Just for fun, I just did a search on Minnesota's web site for some mention of AAU.  Other than a few references buried in some PDFs regarding some surveys, most of the hits are for the Amateur Athletic Union.  You'd think a school like Minnesota would want to tout its membership if it were so important.  What does this organization do, anyway?  Is it anything more than a lobbying organization?  Because that's what most of its activities look like.

 

For what it's worth, you forgot to include the UMD itself in that list, as well as, now, Pittsburgh and Notre Dame.  And you don't know who's in the ACC?  Good grief, man, are you on the internet or not?

 

And do you really think that Michigan State, Rutgers, and SUNY Buffalo are more prestigious than Dartmouth, Amherst, and Boston College?  Please be serious!  That's patently absurd.  Again, review the US News rankings -- both the Big Ten and the ACC have all of their schools in the top 100, with the exception of NC State which in the past few years fell below 100 to 106 because of state budget cuts.  That's higher than any other BCS conference.  Check the Times Higher Education rankings -- six current twelve ACC schools plus two incoming ones in the top 100 international universities, as opposed to six of twelve from the Big Ten.   Basically the same results you get from the Center for Measuring University Performance, or the National Research Council, and on and on.  

 

The only thing more absurd than putting AAU membership on a pedestal is thinking that changing athletic affiliation would somehow affect research dollars, as if playing Michigan and Minnesota in football is going to magically attract faculty who bring in research money.  UMD is already a highly respected research institution (of the Ph.D. programs I applied to, they had the most money to throw around) -- the only reason for the move to the Big Ten would be football revenues for them and the Washington/Baltimore TV market for the Big Ten.  This is all about athletics and TV money, and has nothing to do with research dollars.

Charlie5
Charlie5

 @MTBinDurham  @RickapolisWho is trash-talking? The AAU is the most prestigious association in American collegiate academia (no - I was not aware that Nebraska had recently relinguished membership). Eleven of twelve Big Ten schools are AAU members. I have no idea how many schools are in the ACC, but I know only four - Virginia, Duke, UNC and Gerogia Tech - are AAU members.

 

Yes - a move to the Big Ten represents a step up in academic prestige for Maryland. And the increase in revenue they would realize (over the ACC) from athletics would be dwarfed by the potential increase in research funding.

 

MTBinDurham
MTBinDurham

 @Charlie5  @MTBinDurham  @Rickapolis That's funny, I don't see Nebraska in the member list.  Oh, sorry, did you forget about them?  No, looks like they got booted.  

 

As for the ACC, yes, it looks like NCSU, FSU, Clemson, and Virginia Tech are missing from a list of research-focused universities, which might lead one to wonder whether those four, despite all being top 50 public universities, might have been founded with a mission other than research?

 

The Big Ten has fantastic academics -- props to them (despite being unable to count).  But this is a stupid thing to trash talk about.

Charlie5
Charlie5

 @MTBinDurham  @Rickapolis... and before you spout off, perhaps you could advise how many of the ACC schools are AAU members? All, like The Big Ten?